Grammar is my “thing.”  Listening to someone use incorrect grammar is very much like listening to someone scratch fingernails down a chalkboard.  It “hurts” my ears in the same way.  For that reason, I really work hard to be sure my children understand how to communication correctly.  The other day, 7-year old Braden was trying to tell me a story.  The conversation went like this:

“So,” said Braden, “Sister and me were going to the…”

Interrupting him, I said, “Sister and I.”

Braden looked at me with a confused expression and then started over.  “So Sister and me were going to the…”

Again I interrupted.  “Sister and I.”

“No,” Braden said.  “Sister and me were going to the…”

Yet again I interrupted.  “Sister and I.”

“No!” Braden said in a clearly irritated voice.  “Quit interrupting me!  You weren’t even there!  Sister and ME were there!  Why do you keep saying ‘Sister and I’ when you weren’t even there?  It was just Sister and me!”

And so I’ve been told!

Let’s Play a Game…I’ll Tell you What to Say

As children get older, they get more creative and come up with some of the best ideas to get what they want.  Last week, 7-year old Braden wanted to go visit his little friend who lives a couple of blocks down the street.

“Mom,” said Braden.  “Can I ride my bike to Kellen’s house?”

“No.  Not today.”  I replied.

Apparently, this wasn’t how Braden saw this scenario playing out.  So he decided that a prompt was necessary.  “No…that’s not the right answer,” he said.  “Let’s try again.  I’ll show you.  Now watch:  I say, ‘Mom, can I ride my bike to Kellen’s house?’ and you say, ‘Yes Sweetheart.’  Now, wanna try it again?”

“Ummm…okay…” I said.

“Okay,” Braden said.  “I’ll go first.  Mom, can I ride my bike to Kellen’s house?”

“No.”  I said.

“Ugghh!  You weren’t listening!  I’m supposed to say, ‘Mom, can I ride my bike to Kellen’s house?’ and you’re supposed to say ‘Yes.”  Now pay attention and let’s try it again.”

The urge to keep this going was almost too much to resist.